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FAQ



Frequently Asked General Questions What is the Indianapolis Peace Institute?

What opportunities are available to students? What opportunities are available to the Indianapolis community?

Frequently Asked Student Program Questions

Who is eligible for Peacebuilding Across the Disciplines? What courses are offered and what are they like? Where do classes take place? What are the internship possibilities? What is the student residence like? What is provided at the house, and what will I need to bring with me? What are some of the Peace House community activities? Is there a meal plan? What if I am vegetarian or have special needs? Will I have the same academic calendar as my college? What does the average day look like for a student in the program? What is the cost of the program? Can I visit before I decide to apply? When are applications due? What if I miss the application deadline?

Answers to Frequently Asked General Questions What is the Indianapolis Peace Institute? The Indianapolis Peace Institute operates programs designed to

encourage every person to explore his or her role as a peacebuilder. The

two branches of the Institute work together to create transformational

experiences for college students and for Indianapolis residents. Our

participants reflect on the question of change – what can I do to

implement change?

What opportunities are available to students? • Semester Program: Peacebuilding Across the Disciplines • Summer Program: Peacebuilding Across the Disciplines • Alternative Spring Break: Peacebuilding • Alternative Fall Break: Youth and Violence • Weekend Workshops: A variety of topics

What opportunities are available to the Indianapolis community? • Weekend Workshops: A variety of topics • Mediation training • Play Like a Champion: Positive Coaching program • Training in Conflict Transformation, Group Dynamics and Leadership • Alternative Spring Break: Peacebuilding

Answers to Frequently Asked Student Program Questions Who is eligible for Peacebuilding Across the Disciplines? Peacebuilding can be part of almost any profession, and the skills

developed at the Indianapolis Peace Institute are useful in almost any

field of work. Thus, students from all majors are encouraged to apply.

Previous students have majored in biology, communications, computer

science, history, interdisciplinary studies, journalism, peace studies,

psychology, religion, women’s studies and more.

The program is designed for undergraduate students. Second semester

sophomores, juniors and seniors are encouraged to apply. Recent

graduates may apply to the summer program.

What courses are offered and what are they like? For a list of courses please see our semester program

page. Classes are designed to be small and interactive. Field trips,

visits from local practitioners and community leaders, and student

presentations are as vital to the learning as texts, journal articles

and student papers.

Where do classes take place? Classes usually take place at the administrative offices of the

Indianapolis Peace Institute, which is a short walk from the Peace House

residence. The offices are in the historic “Old Centrum” which also

houses many other non-profit organizations.

What are the internship possibilities? Our Internship Opportunities

section offers a glimpse of our partner organizations. The list

provided is by no means exhaustive. Since we tailor the internship to

your interests, we will work with you to make sure your placement

provides you with an excellent experience

What is the student residence like? Peace House, the Institute’s student residence, is located in a downtown

residential neighborhood of Indianapolis, two blocks north of the

Institute’s offices. Coffee shops, churches, a movie theater, a soccer

field and the heart of downtown are all within walking distance of the

house.

On the main floor of the house, the kitchen, library, den, billiard

room, dining room and sun room offer students a variety of places in

which students nurture their community. Students’ rooms and bathrooms

are located on the 2nd and 3rd floors. The finished basement provides a

computer lab, laundry facilities and more than a few nooks and crannies

to be discovered.

What is provided at the house, and what will I need to bring with me? • Between the computer lab and library, six computers are provided for

student use. Wireless internet access is available should you wish to

bring your own computer. • Sheets and comforters are provided but students should bring a pillow with case and a towel or two.

• Students will need to use a cell phone or calling card to make long

distance calls as the house phone offers only local service for outgoing

calls.

• Students may wish to bring a car, but a car is not necessary. The

local bus system can provide transportation to almost any destination

within the Indianapolis metropolitan area. Several bus stops are within

three blocks of the house. The Peace House parking lot can accommodate

up to 7 student vehicles. Additional parking is available at the

Institute’s office lot two blocks away.

What are some of the Peace House community activities? Structured programs such as Orientation, Internship Reflection sessions

and house meetings guide the development of the Peace House

community. Many additional activities are planned by students

throughout the semester. Examples include group volunteer activities, an

appreciation dinner for students’ mentors, a student-run weekend

workshop for the Indianapolis community and, of course, many

opportunities to explore all that Indy has to offer. In addition, there

will be opportunities for the students to open their home to visiting

practitioners of peacebuilding.

Is there a meal plan? What if I am vegetarian or have special needs? Students taking part in the Semester program will develop a community

plan with regards to meals – what food to buy, who will cook, how often

the group will eat together. A weekly food allowance is provided to the

group as a whole with a smaller individual allowance given to each

student to use as he or she wishes. Vegetarian students or students with

special needs will be a part of the community decision making process

and will be able to voice their needs at that time. The individual

allowance ensures that you will be able to purchase specific items that

you need and want over and above what is purchased as a community.

Students in the summer program are responsible for their own foods costs.

Will I have the same academic calendar as my college? The 2007-2008 calendar is as follows. For information on future academic

years, please contact us. Each semester runs for 16 weeks with a

one-week break during which students may choose to travel, stay at the

house or enroll in the special program offered.

Spring 2008: Jan. 6 – students arrive at Peace House Jan. 7-9 – Orientation

Jan. 10 – First day at internship Jan. 15 – First day of class Jan. 21 – Holiday – Martin Luther King Jr. Day March 1-8 – Spring Break (Peacebuilding Alternative Spring Break) Apr. 23 – Last day at internship Apr. 24-25 – Exit programming and final classes Apr. 26 – Students depart

Fall 2008: Aug 19 – Students arrive at Peace House Aug 20-22 – Orientation Aug 25 – First day at internship Aug 26 – First day of class Sept 1 – Holiday – Labor Day Oct 18-26 – Fall Break (Youth and Violence immersion course) Nov 27, 28 – Thanksgiving Holiday Dec. 10 – Last Day at internship Dec. 11-12 – Exit programming and final classes Dec 13 – Students depart

What does the average day look like for a student in the program? During the semester, students have class two or three days a week.

Internship schedules are set by the students with their mentors and

range from full-time two days a week, to part-time every day (for a

total of 20 hours per week). During the summer there are no classes and

internships are 30-40 hours per week. Tuesday evenings are set aside to

spend as a community. In their free time, students play pool, read the

newspaper, go running, watch movies, go to the farmer’s market, do

volunteer work and more. Students eat dinner together in the evenings,

usually having split the chores of cooking and cleaning. Dinner is often

a time when students engage in spontaneous discussions on important

issues and topics or further thoughts about class. Some evenings might

be spent lingering over these conversations. Other nights, students go

to coffee shops, take walks or go dancing. Most weekends they go

downtown or to the other 5 cultural district neighborhoods – listen to

jazz, salsa dance, attend festivals and peace conferences, read in

bookstore cafes, eat in the wide variety of Indy restaurants and,

occasionally, visit home colleges.

What is the cost of the program? Please visit our semester and summer program pages for a list of fees. If you have specific questions

Can I visit before I decide to apply? You are welcome to visit before you decide to apply.

When are applications due? Spring semester applications are due on November 15, 2007. Summer applications are due on April 1, 2008 Fall semester applications are due on May 15, 2008.

What if I miss the application deadline? Applications sent in after the deadline will be considered if space in

the program remains. Completing your application before the deadline

ensures that Institute staff will have plenty of time to dedicate to

securing the best possible internship for you.


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